Dressing of the Stones

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By: Dr. Troy Sammons, CVM Fieldstaff, transitioning to service in South Sudan

Currently there are five gentlemen armed with axes and carpenter squares diligently preparing building stones for an addition we are working on in Kenya. The stone dressers are special craftsmen who will hand shape each of the seven hundred stones needed for the project.  For the first few days, I glanced at their craft realizing the hard work but not the intricacy of the task.

On day five, after about two thirds of the stones were cut, I asked for a lesson in stone dressing and they eagerly obliged. They taught me how to take a roughly quarried stone and cut it into the specific “bush” style we are using. The process starts by finding the nicest face of the stone and then meticulously squaring up the stone by using a square and an axe to repeatedly chisel a straight line on all sides. Once the stone is squared, the artistic process of cutting a one inch border takes place, so it results in a perfectly cut stone that can be used for building, while maintaining its wild rocky face.

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CVM’s Mission Apprenticeship Program Reaches to Cameroon

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Are you a “missions-minded” vet student in your 3rd or 4th year of vet school? Do you have 4 weeks available to serve on the field? Do you want to receive hands-on training/one-on-one mentoring from a CVM Long-Term Field Worker? If so, then CVM’s Mission Apprenticeship program may be for you!

Applications to the Apprenticeship must be received by October 1st in order to be considered for the 2018-2019 school year.

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Gretchen Landin, a fourth year vet student at University of Pennsylvania and a past CVM Missions Apprenticeship participant, traveled to Cameroon where she worked alongside Dr. Lewis for five weeks and explored the call to serve in overseas missions.

Gretchen was kind enough to share her thoughts on the experience! This is what she had to say.

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Reflections from the Field

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Katherine Sunderland, a vet student from Virginia, was given the opportunity to serve on her first short-term mission trip with CVM to Nicaragua. Katherine and her team spent a week working alongside Pastor Oscar and Tamy Gaitan.

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Katherine was kind enough to answer a few questions for us!

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CVM’s Mission Apprenticeship Program Reaches to Uganda

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Are you a “missions-minded” vet student in your 3rd or 4th year of vet school? Do you have 4 weeks available to serve on the field? Do you want to receive hands-on training/one-on-one mentoring from a CVM Long-Term Field Worker? If so, then CVM’s Mission Apprenticeship program may be for you!

Applications to the Apprenticeship must be received by October 1st in order to be considered for the 2018-2019 school year.

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Victoria Warner, a third year vet student at Tufts University and a past CVM Missions Apprenticeship participant, traveled to Uganda where she worked alongside CLIDE for 8 weeks and explored the call to serve in overseas missions.

Victoria was kind enough to share her thoughts on the experience! This is what she had to say.

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Reflections from the Field

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Christine Crawford, a vet student from North Carolina, was given the opportunity to serve on her first short-term mission trip with CVM to Alaska.

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Christine was kind enough to answer a few questions for us!

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Living Joy Outright

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By: Dr. Troy Sammons, CVM Fieldstaff

The word joy seems to be the most common word to market the Christmas holiday.   From the fancy font in the boulevard banner to the Christmas card message, joy is decoratively spread on all aspects of our Christmas lives.

So now its January and it is time to pack away the joy, take down the ornaments and wall hanging and mugs with our seasonal joy and pack them neatly away into the Christmas boxes, taking care not to damage the signs of joy as we put them away.

How telling, that in January joy gets packed away and out comes the “try harder” resolutions of 2017 with new themes for the year.

Doesn’t this seem rather ironic but a telling ritual of where joy fits in our culture?

For the past six months now the understanding of joy has been rolling like a marble in my brain, as it circles to and fro it constantly bumps into my normal thoughts and helps me re-arrange them with a difference in priority.

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